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Innovations in Reducing Wait Times:
A Video Series

Waiting for services in our health care system is a reality that most Canadians face at one time or another.

The Health Council of Canada presents a pan-Canadian video series featuring innovative practices that are tackling waits for patients in various health care settings.

Watch the videos below to learn about innovative approaches to reducing wait times in Thompson, Manitoba and St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador and come back regularly for more. Additional videos will be released in the summer and Fall of 2013.

> Video 1:  Advanced Access, Thompson, Manitoba
> Video 2:  Orthopedic Central Intake, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
Video 3:  Pay-for-Performance emergency department model, Vancouver, British Columbia
> Video 4:  Building Access to Specialist Care through eConsultation
Video 5:  The Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative
Video 6:  Home First
Video 7:  How queueing theory can influence wait times

Also visit our Health Innovation Portal which houses innovative health care practices, policies, programs and services from across Canada.

Advanced Access, Thompson, Manitoba  (Top)

Find out how the Burntwood Community Health Resource Centre in Thompson, Manitoba has successfully implemented Advanced Access to decrease primary care appointment wait times so that most providers can offer either same day or next day appointments. Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal. 

 

Orthopedic Central Intake, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador  (Top)

Eastern Health’s Orthopedic Central Intake (OCI) project in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, has developed its central intake system in partnership with the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) EXTRA program.  Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal. 

 

Pay-for-Performance emergency department model, Vancouver, British Columbia   (Top)

Faced with ever-increasing demand, emergency departments (EDs) like the one at Vancouver General Hospital struggle to provide patients with timely care and access to diagnostics, while also creating capacity for admitted patients.  The Pay-for-Performance model rewards the hospital with additional funding  if it meets predetermined targets for moving patients through the ED, either to a hospital bed or back to the community. Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal. 

 

 Building Access to Specialist Care through eConsultation   (Top)

In Ontario, as in other provinces, patients and their health care providers often struggle to get access to specialists. To improve doctors' access to specialists, a secure, online platform called Building Access to Specialist Care through eConsultation, or BASE was piloted in Ontario's Champlain Local Health Integration Network from 2010 to 2011. Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal. 

 

 The Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative   (Top)

In 2009, Saskatchewan surveyed its citizens on what mattered most to them in health care. The "Patient's First Review" identified surgical wait times as a key concern. So the province decided to do something about it. In 2010, Saskatchewan's Ministry of Health established the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative to improve surgical wait times across the province. Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal. 

 

 Home First   (Top)

In 2013 Canadian provinces and territories are looking for ways to manage the issue of Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients. In Ontario, the problem has been particularly acute due to large waiting lists—and long waits—for beds in long-term care homes. In the last few years, Ontario has developed a Home First program that sends patients back to their communities and homes with intensive case management. Clients receive several weeks of enhanced home care support, allowing seniors to see how well they manage at home before they make decisions about where they wish to live long-term. Home First allows seniors to make this potentially life-altering decision over time and in a familiar setting, rather than in a stressful and disorienting hospital environment. Read more about this innovative practice on our Health Innovation Portal.  

 

 How queueing theory can influence wait time   (Top)

In this video blog, Dr. David Stanford of Western University demonstrates how queueing theory applies to wait times and how simple changes can have a big impact on reducing them.

Western University has announced a new mathematical finding by an international research team led by Dr. Stanford. It provides the health care system with a more balanced approach to how patients are selected for treatment, which will consequently decrease wait times.  

 

 
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